Evaluations

Evaluation reports linked to music education programmes.

Music work with vulnerable young people in Suffolk shows significant impact on wellbeing

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A year-long impact study funded by the Cabinet Office’s Impact Readiness Fund, concludes that community music organisation Noise Solution’s fusing of informal music outreach and digital narrative work is “Statistically significant” in impacting on the wellbeing of participants in challenging circumstances.

In February 2016, Noise Solution was awarded funding from the Cabinet Office to work with The Social Investment Consultancy to measure its social impact. The resulting impact report shows that Noise Solution has serious impact with the young people it works with.

Noise Solution pairs professional musicians with people facing challenging circumstances, and they are tasked with making particpants successful at creating the music they value. The organisation then captures and shares their achievements using a blog or a ‘positive digital narrative’.

It is this quick mastery of a skill, combined with the easy and targeted sharing of success with the people whose opinions really matter to them that is allowing participants to reinvent themselves in a positive light.

SOURCES:

Youth Music Network: http://network.youthmusic.org.uk/posts/cabinet-office-funded-impact-audit-states-noise-solution-statistically-significant-read-report

Noise Solution: http://www.noisesolution.org/wp-content/uploads/report-view/web/viewer.html?file=noise-solution-external-report.pdf

Music and early years speech and language programme reports on first year

creativefutures‘Music for Change’ 2015-18, is a multi-year programme which enhances children’s early development and improve rates of school readiness among pre-school children in northwest Westminster, an area of multiple deprivation.

It is delivered by Creative Futures, a multi-arts charity which transforms the lives of vulnerable children and young people through high-quality arts programmes.

Devised to meet specific needs identified by the local authority’s Early Years Advisory Team, the project focuses on supporting children with speech and language delay in collaboration with NHS speech and language therapists from Central London Community Healthcare.

This report, on the first year of the project, brings together findings from Creative Futures’ own observations of the project, feedback from Early Years Professionals, extracts from reports provided by the speech and language therapists and music leaders who co-delivered the work, and a process evaluation by Professor Graham Welch from the University College London’s Institute of Education and Alice Bowmer.

SOURCE:
iMerc.org: http://www.imerc.org/research/75-creative-futures

Music in Mind evaluation report published

Continuum of need diagramMusic in Mind is a music making programme which focuses on enhancing the life chances of young people aged 11-to-18 years with mental health needs. It’s led by Rhythmix, a music, education and social welfare charity that provides music opportunities to people in challenging circumstances across south east England.

The programme gives young people a positive outlet for self-expression, the opportunity to gain vocational skills and helps them to gain the self-belief and skills necessary for them to move forward in life.

It encourages musical, social, personal and educational development; focuses on self-expression and resilience; acknowledges complex needs through tailored programmes; and includes workforce development.

What happened, and what works?

In order to assess the programme’s effectiveness, an independent evaluation  was conducted by Dr Alison Daubney and Gregory Daubney MSc between April 2013 and March 2016 – looking at projects in East Sussex, West Sussex, Brighton & Hove, Kent, and Surrey.

During the evaluation many young people spoke about how music was important to them, particularly as a listener. Some discussed their musical preferences and how these related to a strong sense of identity. Some also discussed the importance of music as a mood regulator, including as a mechanism to purposely set or change their mood.

Many of them also saw making music as something to learn and/or develop and not just as something to take part in. They clearly cared about the quality of what they produced, and ‘making music well’ was an important aspect for the young people.

One of the many conclusions of the report is that the importance of music to some young people with mental health needs is significant and should not be ignored or seen as unimportant. For them, music is a perceived lifeline, a fundamental part of who they are, or as was said more than once in the project, “Music, quite literally, is my life”. Not every young person with mental health needs will find that music is the ‘hook’ to help them to seek and accept help, but for some, under the right circumstances, music can help them to take steps towards improved mental health and wellbeing.

SOURCE:
Rhythmix: http://www.rhythmixmusic.org.uk/music_in_mind_evaluation.html