Longitudinal data on the effects of learning an instrument

The German Socio-Economic Panel study (SOEP) is believed by its authors to be the best
available longitudinal data set for studying the effects of learning a musical instrument. Learning a musical instrument is associated with better cognitive skills and school grades as well as higher conscientiousness, openness, and ambition. Music improves cognitive and non-cognitive skills more than twice as much as sports, theatre or dance. To read more, click anywhere on this excerpt …

Youth Music – research from the UK’s national music education charity

Youth Music is a UK charity that makes life-changing music-making available to children and young people through funding music projects and investing in research, as well as supporting music educators to develop and improve their work and impact through an online community for music educators: community musicians, music leaders, music teachers. To read more, click anywhere on this excerpt …

Music with young people in challenging circumstances

Stories/case studies written by Anita Holford and featuring music work with young people in challenging circumstances, supported through Youth Music’sMusical Inclusion programme. If you’re involved in working with young people through music and/or reaching young people who may be disengaged from learning and from life, then these stories will be of interest. To read more, click anywhere on this excerpt.

Cultural activity can improve the health of older people

This research conducted by the George Washington University found that after a year of engaging in a programme of cultural activities people improved their mental and physical health, were less reliant on medication, had fewer falls and fewer visits to the doctor when compared to a group of similar adults who had not participated in the activity. They also felt happier and less lonely and were generally more active.

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