memory

INFOGRAPHIC – music and brain development

A useful infographic about the relationship between music education and brain development, thanks to Ward-Brodt Music Store, Wisconsin, USA.

Source:

Ward-Brodt: https://www.wardbrodt.com/blog/relationship-between-music-education-and-brain-development-madison-wisconsin

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Linking music with other learning areas

Michael Griffin, author of ‘Learning Strategies for Musical Success’ has explored the connections between music and other Gardner-listed multiple intelligences. He believes that life is interdisciplinary and multisensory, and the richer the brain diet stimulated by the senses, the more complex the brain becomes. Learning material presented with pictures and sound provides an emotional attachment that makes it easier to remember and more enjoyable to learn. The most effective memory-building techniques are based on the principle of association, and the strongest associations are emotional.

SOURCE:

Michael Griffin: http://mdgriffin63.wordpress.com/2014/08/02/linking-music-with-other-learning-areas/

How playing an instrument benefits your brain

When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout. What’s going on? Anita Collins of the University of Canberra explains the fireworks that go off in musicians’ brains when they play, and examines some of the long-term positive effects of this mental workout.

Research has shown that learning a musical instrument involves the motor, visual and auditory cortices all at the same time and can enhance reading skills, memory systems, executive function and general cognitive function. Recent research has found the ability for a child to keep a steady beat is an indication that, neurologically, they are ready to begin reading.

Study suggests music may someday help repair brain

SUMMARY:

Research conducted by McGill University in Montreal that suggested that scientists may one day be able to retune damaged minds by exploiting rhythm, harmony and melody. Exploring the neurobiology of music, researchers discovered direct evidence that music stimulates specific regions of the brain responsible for memory, motor control, timing and language. For the first time, researchers also located specific areas of mental activity linked to emotional responses to music.

SOURCE:

Los Angeles Times: http://articles.latimes.com/1998/nov/09/news/mn-40978

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: Improvements to damaged brain
TARGET GROUP: Adults
AGE: Unknown
MUSIC TYPE: General
TYPE OF STUDY: Academic research
NOs INVOLVED: Unknown
PERIOD OF STUDY: Unknown
DATE: 1998
PLACE: Canada

Playing music protects memory, hearing and brain processing

SUMMARY

A study by Dr Nina Kraus’s Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University, showed that musicians suffer less from ageing-related memory and hearing losses than non-musicians. It is believed to be the first study to provide biological evidence that lifelong musical experience has a good impact on the ageing process. Scientific research over the years has shown that studying music has many rewards, but this new research shows that it can fine-tune the human brain, biologically and neurologically enhancing its performance and protecting it from some of the ravages of time.

SOURCES:

ABC News: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/living-longer-learning-musical-instrument-protects-brain-memory/story?id=15482696#.T73sF79ZeXw

Neurobiology of Aging, Volume 33, Issue 7, pp 1483.e1-1483.e4:

CultureCase: http://www.culturecase.org/research/2014/04/lifelong-musical-experience-can-offset-the-effects-that-ageing-has-on-the-brain/

Neurobiology of Aging: http://www.neurobiologyofaging.org/article/S0197-4580%2811%2900547-1/abstract

Research Report: http://www.brainvolts.northwestern.edu/documents/APC_SA_NK_NeuroAging_2012.pdf

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: Memory & hearing loss
TARGET GROUP: Adults
AGE: 18-65 years
MUSIC TYPE: General
TYPE OF STUDY: Academic research
NOs INVOLVED: 87
PERIOD OF STUDY: Unknown
DATE: 2012
PLACE: United States

Instrumental music training boosts verbal memory

SUMMARY

A study led by Ingo Roden of Carl von Ossietzky University in Oldenburg, Germany found that young children who took instrumental music lessons did better than their peers on verbal memory tests.

This builds on research conducted in Canada in 2011 (http://www.psmag.com/education/music-training-enhances-childrens-verbal-intelligence-36701/) and Hong Kong in 1998 and 2003 (http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/neu/17/3/439/).

SOURCE:

Pacific-Standard: http://www.psmag.com/blogs/news-blog/more-evidence-music-training-boosts-brainpower-51407/

 

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: Verbal memory
TARGET GROUP: Young people
AGE: 7-8 years
MUSIC TYPE: General
TYPE OF STUDY: Academic research
NOs INVOLVED: 73
PERIOD OF STUDY: 1 year 6 months
DATE: 2013
PLACE: Germany