Longitudinal data on the effects of learning an instrument

The German Socio-Economic Panel study (SOEP) is believed by its authors to be the best
available longitudinal data set for studying the effects of learning a musical instrument. Learning a musical instrument is associated with better cognitive skills and school grades as well as higher conscientiousness, openness, and ambition. Music improves cognitive and non-cognitive skills more than twice as much as sports, theatre or dance. To read more, click anywhere on this excerpt …

Youth Music – research from the UK’s national music education charity

Youth Music is a UK charity that makes life-changing music-making available to children and young people through funding music projects and investing in research, as well as supporting music educators to develop and improve their work and impact through an online community for music educators: community musicians, music leaders, music teachers. To read more, click anywhere on this excerpt …

The Power of Music

The power of music: its impact on intellectual, social and personal development

In August 2010, Professor Susan Hallam of the Institute of Education at the University of London, published an overview paper on the impact of music on intellectual, personal and social development. She concludes that playing an instrument can lead to a sense of achievement; an increase in self-esteem; increased confidence; self-discipline; and provide a means of self-expression. While participating in musical groups promotes friendships; social skills; a sense of belonging; team-work; co-operation; commitment; mutual support; increased concentration and provides an outlet for relaxation. To read more click anywhere on this excerpt …

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