music participation

Research from Kansas on link between music education & academic achievement

Researchers from the University of Kansas have confirmed what decades of anecdotal evidence and the evidence on this site and elsewhere suggests : that increased music participation has important direct and indirect effects on student achievement and engagement. This isn’t a recent study but it has a robust sample, and we’ve just found it – so we’re sharing it here.

A baseline study commissioned by Nashville’s Music Makes Us initiative (published in October 2013), examined four years of district-wide data on the 2012 graduating class (6006 pupils), as well as student surveys (71 received) and focus groups (93 participants), to determine what influence music can have on students.

It showed that students in music programs outperformed their peers on every indicator: grade-point average, graduation rate, ACT scores, attendance and discipline referrals. Overall, the study demonstrated that the more a student participates in music, the more positive these benefits become.

SOURCES:
University of Kansas: https://news.ku.edu/2014/01/14/ku-research-establishes-link-between-music-education-and-academic-achievement
Music Makes Us: http://musicmakesus.org/prelude-music-makes-us-baseline-research-report

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT & ENGAGEMENT
TARGET GROUP: CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS
AGE: 10-18 YEARS
MUSIC TYPE: GENERAL
TYPE OF STUDY: ACADEMIC RESEARCH
NOs INVOLVED: 6170
PERIOD OF STUDY: 2008-12
DATE: 2014
PLACE: USA

How music could reduce healthcare costs of the UK’s ageing population

SUMMARY:

A year-long study by the Institute of Education, University of London, found that older people who are part of music groups are more likely to be happier – and even healthier – than their peers who opt for alternative leisure pursuits. The researchers surveyed 400 people aged between 50 and 93 who participated in community music sessions. Activities ranged from singing and composing to playing the ukulele and dancing the Samba. They questioned an additional 100 people who attended classes in arts and crafts, yoga or languages, or who were part of a book club or social group. The study found that those who took part in music groups had higher levels of well-being, including a stronger sense of purpose in life and of feeling in control. They also had more positive social relationships than those taking part in other activities.

SOURCE:

Institute of Education: http://www.ioe.ac.uk/newsEvents/88614.html

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: Health and wellbeing
TARGET GROUP: Older people
AGE: 50-93 years
MUSIC TYPE: Amateur music groups
TYPE OF STUDY: Academic research
NOs INVOLVED: 500 (400 music, 100 arts/crafts)
PERIOD OF STUDY: 1 year
DATE: 2013
PLACE: United Kingdom