skills for life

Music education advocacy publication: how music helps students learn, achieve, and succeed

Music Education advocacy doc

Music education advocacy document

The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) in Washington DC published a useful advocacy document for music education in 2011, funded by the Quincy Jones Musiq Consortium. It was based on a review of an extensive body of high-quality, evidence-based studies that document student learning outcomes in and through music.

The results show conclusively that music education equips students with the foundational abilities to learn, to achieve in other core academic subjects, and to develop the capacities, skills and knowledge essential for lifelong success.

The document summarises the benefits around three main areas: (1) Music education prepares students to learn; (2) Music education facilitates student academic achievement; and (3) Music education develops the creative capacities for lifelong success.

SOURCES:

Arts Education Partnership: http://www.aep-arts.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Music-Matters-Final.pdf

The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC): http://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+education&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_2011&ff2=subMusic+Education&id=ED541070

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: LEARNING ABILITY, ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT, CREATIVE SKILLS FOR LIFE
TARGET GROUP: EVERYONE
AGE: ALL AGE GROUPS
MUSIC TYPE: GENERAL
TYPE OF STUDY: REVIEW OF ACADEMIC RESEARCH
NOs INVOLVED: UNKNOWN
PERIOD OF STUDY: UNKNOWN
DATE: 2011
PLACE: USA

Music and Emotional Intelligence

Learning Strategies for Musical Success

This series of posts explores connections between music and other Gardner-listed multiple intelligences. My previous posts discussed  Music and the Body, Music and Nature, Music and Words, Music and Numbers, and Music and Pictures.

In 2009 a report from the UK’s authoritative Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted) criticized music educators for not exploiting music’s ‘powerful’ potential for improving pupils’ lives. Ofsted was referring to the emotional-intelligence benefits of music education.

When students engage in project-based learning they get opportunity to develop and practise a range of skills to which traditional schooling does not cater. Relating to peers involves decision-making, expressing opinions, tolerating and accepting different views, regulating emotions, cooperating, and not always getting one’s way. These are skills of emotional intelligence. Increasingly the world is acknowledging that emotional intelligence (EI)—also referred to as emotional quotient (EQ) and social and emotional learning (SEL)—is essential for school…

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Business leaders do their jobs better by applying lessons from the performing art

In January 2014, Ruth Blatt posted an article on the Forbes website, reporting that a career in the performing arts is great preparation for a career in business. Former actors, artists and musicians populate boardrooms across the country. And they are touting the benefits of their artistic training.

SOURCE:

Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/sites/ruthblatt/2014/01/22/these-business-leaders-do-their-jobs-better-by-applying-lessons-from-music/

Linking music with other learning areas

Michael Griffin, author of ‘Learning Strategies for Musical Success’ has explored the connections between music and other Gardner-listed multiple intelligences. He believes that life is interdisciplinary and multisensory, and the richer the brain diet stimulated by the senses, the more complex the brain becomes. Learning material presented with pictures and sound provides an emotional attachment that makes it easier to remember and more enjoyable to learn. The most effective memory-building techniques are based on the principle of association, and the strongest associations are emotional.

SOURCE:

Michael Griffin: http://mdgriffin63.wordpress.com/2014/08/02/linking-music-with-other-learning-areas/