wellbeing

Singing can help the immune system and improve mood

Picture courtesy of the Bristol Wellbeing Choir

Picture courtesy of the Bristol Wellbeing Choir

SUMMARY:

This research was conducted by Gunter Kreutz, Stephan Bongard, Sonja Rohrmann, Volker Hodapp and Dorothee Grebe at Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Germany (now at the University of Oldenburg, Germany). The research compared the levels of immunoglobulin A (S-IgA), cortisol and emotional states of people after they had participated in a choir practice with when they had simply listened to choral music.

 

 

The research found that (compared to listening) those engaged in group singing increased their positive mood and levels of S-IgA. Since depletion of S-IgA is associated with tiring and stressful states, and S-IgA is crucial ‘as the body’s first line of defence against bacterial and viral infections of the upper respiratory pathway’ this means that if music enhances S-IgA levels then it could be an important means of relieving stress and improving health.

SOURCES:

CultureCase: http://www.culturecase.org/research/2014/04/singing-can-help-the-immune-system-and-improve-mood/

Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 623-635 / Springer: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10865-004-0006-9

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: Wellbeing, health, reduced stress
TARGET GROUP: Adults
AGE: 29-74 years
MUSIC TYPE: Choir
TYPE OF STUDY: Academic research
NOs INVOLVED: 31
PERIOD OF STUDY: 2 weeks
DATE: 2004
PLACE: Germany

Musical interaction with dementia patients reduces agitation and medication, improves mood and posture

SUMMARY:

Music sessions with orchestral players appear to reduce agitation and medication of patients, while improving mood and posture. The sessions were funded by Care UK, which runs 123 residential homes for elderly people, and overseen by Manchester University. The aim was to find out if classical music can improve communication and interaction, and reduce agitation for people in the UK living with dementia. Initial results show that the sessions have reduced the agitation and medication of dementia patients, while improving their mood and posture.

SOURCE:

The Guardian: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jun/29/musical-therapy-helps-dementia-patients-harmony

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: Wellbeing
TARGET GROUP: People with dementia
AGE: Older people
MUSIC TYPE: Western classical
TYPE OF STUDY: Academic research
NOs INVOLVED: Unknown
PERIOD OF STUDY: 10 weeks (pilot study)
DATE: 2014
PLACE: United Kingdom

How music could reduce healthcare costs of the UK’s ageing population

SUMMARY:

A year-long study by the Institute of Education, University of London, found that older people who are part of music groups are more likely to be happier – and even healthier – than their peers who opt for alternative leisure pursuits. The researchers surveyed 400 people aged between 50 and 93 who participated in community music sessions. Activities ranged from singing and composing to playing the ukulele and dancing the Samba. They questioned an additional 100 people who attended classes in arts and crafts, yoga or languages, or who were part of a book club or social group. The study found that those who took part in music groups had higher levels of well-being, including a stronger sense of purpose in life and of feeling in control. They also had more positive social relationships than those taking part in other activities.

SOURCE:

Institute of Education: http://www.ioe.ac.uk/newsEvents/88614.html

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: Health and wellbeing
TARGET GROUP: Older people
AGE: 50-93 years
MUSIC TYPE: Amateur music groups
TYPE OF STUDY: Academic research
NOs INVOLVED: 500 (400 music, 100 arts/crafts)
PERIOD OF STUDY: 1 year
DATE: 2013
PLACE: United Kingdom